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Host : Dr. Tom Shives
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Host : Tracy McCray
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MAYO CLINIC RADIO with DR. TOM SHIVES and TRACY MCCRAY is the fast paced weekly one hour talk show featuring the latest authoritative information about health and medical breakthroughs.

Each episode features guest experts from Mayo Clinic, with fascinating medical facts, new health research, and helpful advice, presented in a compelling, relatable way.

Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon TOM SHIVES, M.D. has hosted MAYO CLINIC RADIO for two decades. Dr. Shives is an Orthopedic Surgeon at Mayo Clinic and his academic rank is Professor of Orthopedics.

TRACY MCCRAY is a long time radio talk show host and co-host of MAYO CLINIC RADIO. As a 26 year cancer survivor, Tracy has an intense interest in medicine and helping patients become their own best health advocates.

Recent Episodes
 
April 08, 2017
Parkinson's Disease
Parkinson's disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects movement. Parkinsonís develops gradually, sometimes starting with a barely noticeable tremor in just one hand. While a tremor may be the most well-known sign of Parkinson's disease, the disorder commonly also causes stiffness and slowing of movement. April is Parkinsonís Disease Awareness Month, and on the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, neurologist Dr. J. Eric Ahlskog will discuss treatment options for Parkinson's disease. Also on the program, preventive medicine and rehabilitation expert Dr. Jay Smith will share new treatment options for carpal tunnel syndrome. And palliative care specialist Dr. Jacob Strand will explain how early referrals to hospice care can help patients and families benefit from many of the services they are eligible for at the end of life.

 
April 01, 2017
Clinic Transplant Center
According to the Organ Procurement and Transplant Network, each day in the U.S., around 120,000 people are waiting for an organ transplant, and another person gets added to that list every 10 minutes. April is National Donate Life Month ó a campaign to encourage Americans to register as organ, eye and tissue donors. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, learn about Mayo Clinic's Transplant Center from its former director, Dr. Brooks Edwards. Also on the program, psychologist Dr. Andrea Huebner will discuss autism spectrum disorder. And Dr. K Sreekumaran Nair shares findings of a recent study that shows high-intensity interval training can help reverse the aging process at the cellular level.
 
March 25, 2017
Diabetes Alert Day
According to Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, more than 29 million Americans have diabetes. Thatís about 1 out of every 11 people in the U.S. Just as startling is that 1 out of 4 people with diabetes donít know they have it. Diabetes means there is too much glucose, or sugar, in the blood. This can lead to serious health problems, such as increased risk of cardiovascular disease, nerve and kidney damage, and problems with the eyes and feet. The fourth Tuesday in March is Diabetes Alert Day ó a one-day wake-up call to inform the American public about the seriousness of diabetes, particularly when diabetes is left undiagnosed or untreated. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, endocrinologist Dr. Robert Rizza will discuss diagnosis, treatment and prevention of diabetes. Also on the program, neurologist Dr. David Knopman will share information on how the brain ages and what can be done to protect brain health. And Debbie Fuehrer, a counselor with Mayo Clinic's Integrative Medicine and Health Program, will explain how hypnosis is used in the clinical setting.
 
March 18, 2017
Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month
According to the National Institutes of Health, colorectal cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the U.S. and the second leading cause of death from cancer. Most cases of colon cancer begin as small, noncancerous (benign) clumps of cells called polyps that, over time, can become colon cancers. Polyps may be small and produce few, if any, symptoms, so regular screening tests are recommended to help prevent colon cancer by identifying and removing polyps before they become cancerous. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, gastroenterologist Dr. David Ahlquist will discuss colorectal cancer screening and prevention as part of Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Also on the program, surgeon Dr. Rodrigo Ruano will explain fetal surgery Ė in utero procedures now possible to correct some birth defects. And Dr. Stephen Cassivi, vice chair of Mayo Clinic's Department of Surgery, will explain a pilot study that's using video visits for post-surgical follow-up.According to the National Institutes of Health, colorectal cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the U.S. and the second leading cause of death from cancer. Most cases of colon cancer begin as small, noncancerous (benign) clumps of cells called polyps that, over time, can become colon cancers. Polyps may be small and produce few, if any, symptoms, so regular screening tests are recommended to help prevent colon cancer by identifying and removing polyps before they become cancerous. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, gastroenterologist Dr. David Ahlquist will discuss colorectal cancer screening and prevention as part of Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Also on the program, surgeon Dr. Rodrigo Ruano will explain fetal surgery Ė in utero procedures now possible to correct some birth defects. And Dr. Stephen Cassivi, vice chair of Mayo Clinic's Department of Surgery, will explain a pilot study that's using video visits for post-surgical follow-up.
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